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rosacea

Rosacea treatmentsNewer topical agents for rosacea including ivermectin and brimonidine are effective, and soon could be joined by oxymetazoline cream, experts say. Initial results from phase 2 trials of minocycline foam in rosacea could be available by year's end.
Factors in rosacea pathogenesis clearerKeeping abreast of findings regarding the immunological, neurological and vascular roots of rosacea helps dermatologists target treatments accordingly, experts say.
The role of nueroinflammation in rosaceaNeuroinflammation has recently been recognized as one of the possible factors leading to the development of rosacea. As such, future therapies targeting this pathway could prove effective in rosacea treatment.
Appreciating the role of microbial communities on the skinMicrobial colonization in the development of inflammatory conditions and immune-mediated conditions is a hot research topic, and new dermatologic therapies can potentially result from greater understanding of the role of microbial communities on the skin and in the gut.
4 steps to beating blepharitisBlepharitis is an inflammatory condition of the eyelids leading to red, irritated, itchy, and dandruff-like scales that form on the eyelashes.
Alternative therapies hold promise for rosaceaSome unconventional therapies for rosacea get to the root of the problem, with apparent positive impacts on inflammation, skin barrier dysfunction and vascular function.
Green tea shows promise in skin treatmentResearch reveals a fascinating story with an amazing dichotomy.
Rosacea patients confused and worriedResearchers analyzed messages in an online forum to understand the most vexing issues facing rosacea patients. They found tremendous confusion around available therapeutics.
What’s all the craze about demodex?
What’s all the craze about demodex?While many eyecare practitioners (ECPs) are just now learning about Demodex infestation of the eyelids and adnexa, the fact is that this condition has been around for as long as mankind. The entomologists Johannsen and Riley from Cornell University first described the species in detail anatomically as early as 1915, but it wasn’t until the 1960s that clinical reports of demodex-related blepharitis began to emerge in the literature.
Exploring ocular demodicosis in chronic blepharitisBy knowing the signs and symptoms of Demodex, ophthalmologists can better diagnose and offer treatments for blepharitis.