psoriasis

60 percent risk of alcohol-related death in psoriasisNEJM analysis proves what has been suspected for decades: Alcohol can be more deadly in the psoriasis population as compared to non-psoriasis patients.
The top 25 psoriasis authorsIn 2018 at just five days into the New Year, a search of PubMed revealed 86 new psoriasis studies. So, who is leading the pack?
Herpes zoster rates stay steady with biologics in psoriasisStudy shows no significant difference in herpes zoster risk between psoriasis patients receiving systemic therapy and those not receiving systemic therapy.
2017’s big breakthroughsThe dermatology community experienced big strides in medical and cosmetic dermatology in 2017. Dermatologists share what they think were major breakthroughs throughout the year.
Impaired taste and smell may explain poor nutrition in psoriasis patientsPsoriasis has long been linked with poor nutrition, high body mass index and metabolic disorders. New research suggests a reduced sense of taste and smell, caused by inflammation, may explain why.
Genetic variation may explain why biologics help some patients, but fail othersPsoriasis patients carrying a specific gene experience a significantly better early response to ustekinumab, but are less likely to achieve high rates of response to anti-TNFs.
Cardiovascular disease in psoriasis may be due to a cardiosplenic axisThe spleen may have a role in driving the higher rate of cardiovascular disease seen in psoriasis patients through a spleen–atherosclerotic axis, suggests research presented at a meeting in London.
Diet and lifestyle factors may trigger psoriasisEnvironmental and lifestyle factors, such as certain foods and infections, may trigger onset of psoriasis and account for approximately 30% of the risk of the condition in people with a genetic preposition, research presented in London shows.
Restarting TNFi treatment after a break proves beneficial in psoriasisSwitching from adalimumab to etanercept or vice versa after interruption can improve treatment response, data presented in London suggests.
Hard-to-treat psoriasis cases respond to secukinumabSecukinumab has been shown to be effective for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis in hard-to-treat patients who failed anti-TNFa treatment, researchers report in London.