Isotretinoin therapy for acne still on trackReview provides solid, reaffirming scientific data in support of using the medication for acne.
Acne in pregnancyTreating acne in pregnancy requires familiarity with FDA medication categories and having thorough discussions with patients
The best and worst of acne treatment optionsPoor quality trials make assessing effects of non-pharmacological treatments in acne difficult, but based on the evidence, glycolic acid, amino fruit acid, intense pulsed light and diode laser are the most promising.
Medication adherence comes down to costDermatologists should discuss cost and insurance coverage concerns with patients to boost adherence to acne medication, researchers report in JAMA Dermatology.
Spironolactone prescriptions for acne riseBetween 2004 and 2013, the number of spironolactone courses per 100 females with acne rose from 2.08 to 8.13 among dermatologists and from 1.43 to 4.09 among nondermatologists, researchers report.
Transgender dermatology care faces unique challengesThe transgender dermatology patient may face a unique set of challenges doctors should be prepared to address, says Dr. Brian Ginsberg.
Spironolactone for hormonal acneFemale patients with hormonal acne that typically flares before or after menstrual cycles may be ideal candidates for spironolactone, said Emmy M. Graber, M.D., president of the Dermatology Institute of Boston who spoke at AAD 2018 in San Diego this week.
Oral antibiotic prescriptions remain highDespite recommendations to limit the use of oral antibiotics, dermatologists continue to prescribe them in high numbers, according to results of a large, retrospective analysis of U.S. prescribing trends from 2004 to 2013.
Technology proves better than human eye in acne assessmentDermatologist evaluations of patient acne photos submitted via smartphone compare favorably to in-person evaluations, a JAMA Dermatology study shows.
When flushing is more than embarrassmentAcute or irregular flushing may signal a more serious health condition, say researchers who list 14 questions physicians should ask patients complaining about unusual flushing.