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Derms likely to misdiagnose fungal infections on visual inspectionA recent survey asking dermatologists to visually determine whether clinical photos are or aren’t fungal infections suggests visual inspection might not be enough for accurate diagnoses.
What are parabens?There has been recent concern about the safety of parabens as they are the most frequently used preservative in skin care products today
What are the safety concerns associated with parabens?Safety concerns over parabens arose because they mimic estrogen by binding to estrogen receptors.
Are there any safe preservatives?Providing safe products that consumers can use with confidence requires preservatives. However, the concept of preservation is not unique to skin care products.
Is it worthwhile to advise patients to purchase paraben-free products?Many skin care products are now advertising the “paraben-free” claim, however the parabens must be replaced with another preservative.
What are natural skin care products? Are they preservative-free?No one is really sure what constitutes a natural skin care product, since all ingredients are natural to the earth!
The Joys of Spring Cleaning and Sharing KnowledgeAfter a sudden urge to tidy up his office, Dr. Ronald G. Wheeland developed another urge to figure out what to do with his old dermatology books and journals.
Fractional resurfacing and the standard of careIt is important to note that where there are two or more recognized methods of diagnosing or treating the same condition, a physician does not fall below the standard of care by using any of the acceptable methods even if one method turns out to be less effective than another method.
A new era in atopic derm treatmentPromising new treatments recently approved or under development for atopic dermatitis include crisaborole, JAK inhibitors and dupilumab, an expert said.
Brodalumab approved for psoriasisDr. Mark Lebwohl talks about the FDA’s approval of the anti-interleukin-17 receptor monoclonal antibody brodalumab (Siliq, Valeant Pharmaceuticals) for treatment of adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.
Accelerating skin disease researchAvailable resources of the Center include human pathology specimens and database info on living consented patients. Techniques such as tissue imaging, gene expression analysis, T-cell receptor, sequencing studies, and CyTOF analyses are available. Visiting Scholar grants funds allow researchers to learn how to work with human tissue and how to use new techniques.
Targeted treatments for atopic dermatitisEmerging treatments are expected to help fill the need for safer and more effective therapies for atopic dermatitis (AD). Both systemic and topical treatments are needed to provide full and complete treatment for patients with AD. Targeting the specific axis or axes that control AD may contribute to developing personalized approaches to treatment
Therapies for hidradenitis suppurativaTNF inhibitors adalimumab and infliximab have evidence-based efficacy for the treatment of hidradentitis suppurativa (HS). Anti-interleukin inhibitors ustekinumab and anakinra also being evaluated in small studies for treatment of HS. Antibiotics, hormones, retinoids, steroids and laser therapies directly targeting the lesions round out an effective treatment plan for HS patients.
Understanding and using biosimilarsBiosimilars have the potential to lower the high costs of biologic treatments for patients suffering from chronic skin diseases. Although biosimilars have received FDA approval derms still have many questions about what they are and when they may be used appropriately. Patent wars and a lack of rules and regulations at the state level add to the confusion about using biosimilars.
Study finds significant inpatient burden for AD patientsA recent study looked at the inpatient burden on patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) in the United States and found a significant financial burden due to the high hospitalization rates.
Advances in lasers, light sourcesLaser and light source treatments target many of the most common skin conditions that dermatologists encounter. The recent expansion in laser dermatology is both promising and exciting as the treatments available to derms and their patients continue to grow. New technologies are taking laser and light source treatments in new directions of skin structure imaging, epidermal harvesting, tissue rejuvenation, and new types of photodynamic therapies.
When subtle isn't enoughStudies suggest that a more aggressive approach to neck tightening procedures yields better results. Patients can experience significant pain and edema from these procedures that may require prescription medications to treat. The procedures cost thousands of dollars, raising questions about whether they're worth the cost for patients.
Picking the best peelMany different types of peels are available to successfully treat a wide variety of skin conditions. Instances of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) that develop after healing of peel or laser treatments may require additional management. Attendance at workshops and use of prepackaged kits can help derms gain confidence in providing peel treatments to patients.
Key clinical features differentiate nail tumor typesSquamous cell carcinoma often associated with HPV. Surgical excision for four types of tumors is largely successful. Imaging of glomus tumors recommended prior to intervention.
SRT: Technology offers positive benefits and strong cure ratesToday’s SRT technology embodies very small, stable machines. Radiation leaks are not longer a concern. The SRT-100 System serves both an important medical and cosmetic role.
Melanoma staging updatesThe American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) 8th Edition Melanoma Staging System includes important changes pertaining to T1 melanomas. The role of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) continues to evolve, particularly for thin melanomas. A contemporary international dataset is being applied to develop sophisticated and accurate personalized prognostic tools.
Handling (or even firing) the difficult patientA panel of veteran dermatologists tackled the topic of difficult patients at the 2016 CalDerm Symposium and offered some tips for successfully dealing with these patients.
ICD-10 codes aren't oppressive after allAlexander Miller, MD, a dermatologist in Yorba Linda, Calif., has a simple message for colleagues grappling with the new ICD-10 codes: Don't panic!
Diagnostic & Therapeutic Guidance for Atopic DermatitisThe April Table of the Month discusses diagnostic and therapeutic tips for AD patients.
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