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Challenging skin cancer diagnosesIn this installment of our melanoma case studies series, we focus on common cancers in unusual locations versus uncommon cancers in classic locations.
My EMR has been hacked. What should I do?Dr. Derm logged into his office computer system, only to find a ransom note from a hacker, asking for money in exchange for the safe return of his patients’ records. Who are these hackers? How do they gain access? What should Dr. Derm do?
Comprehending cleanser developmentSoap has probably done more to improve world health than any prescription medication, says Dr. Zoe Diana Draelos in her monthly Dermatology Times column, "Cosmetic Conundrums."
The on/off button comes to dermatologyDermatologists will need to understand new device technologies and incorporate them judiciously into disease treatment where appropriate.
When flushing is more than embarrassmentAcute or irregular flushing may signal a more serious health condition, say researchers who list 14 questions physicians should ask patients complaining about unusual flushing.
An advocate for changeA conversation with ASDS president-elect Murad Alam, M.D.
A 1,854% price hikeThe cost of doxycycline hyclate prescriptions increased 1,854% between 2011 and 2013 in a retrospective analysis of commercial claims data, and there was no association between market concentration and price of the oral antibiotic. Clinician or pharmacy level interventions to choose less costly oral tetracycline-class antibiotics could result in substantial cost savings.
6 concerns about practice consolidationBig cash offers not always best for the practice or patient.
At-home photobiomodulation therapy for hair lossDermatologists should be prepared to counsel patients about PBMT home-based treatment options for hair loss, say dermatologists from the University of Minnesota who reviewed 13 FDA-approved PBMT devices. (©EvgeniyKalinovskiy/Shutterstock.com)
The artificial brain as doctorNeural networks do pattern recognition just as a dermatologist would learn patterns and visual data. Computer accuracy rivals that of humans for classifying skin cancer. Deep neural networks and artificial intelligence may have a growing role in practice.
In-demand dermatology treatment devicesA rising prevalence of skin disorders, including melanoma, will drive the need for diagnostic imaging and treatment technologies in dermatology, market analysts say.
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