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Vaginal rejuvenation and the cosmetic practiceIt’s proving to be a viable addition to the scope of service in the cosmetic practice, but be forewarned: It’s serious business.
Supportive oncodermatologySkin side effects from anticancer treatments can be a special burden for patients already suffering the extreme pressures of a cancer diagnosis. Treatments must be customized for patients based on the type of cancer and treatment, as well as the patient’s personal goals. Close and active relationships with patients are vital to assure the best possible outcome.
Taking a closer look at ThermiVaAccording to RealSelf ratings, patients think it’s a worthwhile treatment. Two practices share their experience with ThermiVa… and a GYN expert offers a few cautionary tips.
Vollure: The new 18-month fillerAccording to Allergan, Vollure blends various molecular weights of HA to help achieve an impressive 18 months of duration on average.
Attractive vs. artificial lipsResearchers define a mathematical measurement that determines the threshold for artificial lip augmentation results.
Aesthetic procedures for female genitaliaThinking about offering vaginal rejuvenation services? Plastic surgeon Christine A. Hamori, M.D., offers her advice for both surgical and nonsurgical procedures.
Rejuvenating the eyes? Choose wiselyAccording to Bahman Guyuron, M.D., when it comes periorbital rejuvenation, techniques may seem similar, but they’re not interchangeable.
Complications in breast augmentationAccording to Mitchell Brown, M.D., capsular contracture and implant malposition are two major drivers of re-operation. These are his tips for prevention and management.
ECP may prevent mycosis fungoides progressionExtracorporeal photopheresis is underused for early-stage mycosis fungoides. ECP is capable of correcting the cytokine imbalance seen in patients with MF and results in an increase of Th1 cytokines. Clinicians should consider more frequent use in select patients
Many areas of purple ecchymosis
Many areas of purple ecchymosisAn 82-year-old woman who loved to volunteer at her local botanical garden noticed that this past summer she had developed many areas of purple ecchymosis. She told her doctor that they seemed to appear mainly on her arms and hands, where the sun was most often blazing down on her, though she was diligent about using sunscreen these days. The only change she could think of from previous summers, when she hadn’t experienced such easy bruising, was that she had started taking daily aspirin at her doctor’s suggestion.

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