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When flushing is more than embarrassmentAcute or irregular flushing may signal a more serious health condition, say researchers who list 14 questions physicians should ask patients complaining about unusual flushing.
Comprehending cleanser developmentSoap has probably done more to improve world health than any prescription medication, says Dr. Zoe Diana Draelos in her monthly Dermatology Times column, "Cosmetic Conundrums."
Satisfying cosmetic safetyThe FDA has proposed regulating the cosmetic industry, says Dr. Zoe Diana Draelos in her monthly Dermatology Times column, "Cosmetic Conundrums." This month Dr. Draelos examines three key questions about cosmetic safety.
Female dermatologists sued less often than male counterpartsAlthough most malpractice cases against dermatologists are abandoned, withdrawn or dismissed, communication with patients may minimize liability.
The artificial brain as doctor
The artificial brain as doctorNeural networks do pattern recognition just as a dermatologist would learn patterns and visual data. Computer accuracy rivals that of humans for classifying skin cancer. Deep neural networks and artificial intelligence may have a growing role in practice.
My EMR has been hacked. What should I do?Dr. Derm logged into his office computer system, only to find a ransom note from a hacker, asking for money in exchange for the safe return of his patients’ records. Who are these hackers? How do they gain access? What should Dr. Derm do?
A 1,854% price hikeThe cost of doxycycline hyclate prescriptions increased 1,854% between 2011 and 2013 in a retrospective analysis of commercial claims data, and there was no association between market concentration and price of the oral antibiotic. Clinician or pharmacy level interventions to choose less costly oral tetracycline-class antibiotics could result in substantial cost savings.
A noteworthy margin of error in psoriasis?Dermatologists need to be aware of margin of error and related issues that can affect the results of biosimilar clinical trials, a study shows.
Vitamin D may aid serious burnsVitamin D supplements are known to reduce the inflammation and swelling associated with sunburn, but a new study from Birmingham University suggests that it may also help with more serious burns.
What’s going to be hot in 2018?What exciting new devices, drugs and treatments will the New Year bring dermatologists and their patients? Physicians in the specialty and others share what they most anticipate in the coming year.

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