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Laser and injectable options for treatment of keloidsLaser treatments, non-steroid injectables, and topical applications of imiquimod cream are proving to be effective in the treatment of keloids and excessive scarring. In many cases, recurrence rates have dropped to 20% and lower from former highs of 70% or more.
Am I liable for a glitch in my EHR system?Although the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 authorized initial grants and incentives to promote “meaningful use” of electronic health records (EHRs) by providers, one of the potential risks that has not been given much discussion is the risk of medical malpractice liability.
A new year, new era in dermatology, new magazineThe word of the moment is "new!" We have a new year, a new president, we are looking at the possibility of another new organizational structure in medicine, and we are working on a new look here at Dermatology Times.
Phase 3 results demonstrate dupilumab efficacyNew data suggests positive safety and efficacy profile. Further studies need to assess long-term use.
Keloid disorder: a clinical management updateFor decades, a lack of scientific data and evidence-based medicine have resulted in essentially no changes in the treatment of keloid disorder. New studies confirm that cryotherapy and intralesional injections of vincristine can be effective treatments for different types of keloids.
Burn depth difficult to determine with the naked eyeVisual assessment of a burn injury is insufficient to judge the depth of a burn; hypertrophic scars left by burn injuries are increasingly being treated with lasers with impressive results.
Rosacea treatmentsNewer topical agents for rosacea including ivermectin and brimonidine are effective, and soon could be joined by oxymetazoline cream, experts say. Initial results from phase 2 trials of minocycline foam in rosacea could be available by year's end.
Research suggests new approaches to treat ADResearch aimed at understanding the host-microbial interface in atopic dermatitis is ongoing but already providing insights for novel therapeutic strategies.
'Dr. Scar' shares treatment pearlsA U.S. dermatologist shares his experience working with a Chinese plastic surgeon who does a high-volume of scar treatments.
The Skinny on fat reduction, cellulite devicesFresh after her presentations on fat reduction and cellulite treatment devices at ASDS, Sue Ellen Cox, M.D., offers unplugged advice about today’s technologies.
What cellulite? Cellfina leads the wayCellfina is subscision of the fibrous attachments between the skin and fat layers. It is the only FDA-cleared device to have solid three-year data showing that the cellulite doesn’t come back, expert says.
Motivating teens not to tan, on teens’ termsYou might be surprised about what researchers have uncovered about why teens tan. Having a better understanding of their motives, could help you help them.
Responding to melanoma’s growing threatMelanoma’s burden is increasing and the rising rates cannot simply be attributed to increased disease detection, according to a research letter published last month in JAMA Dermatology.
New era looming MCC treatmentImmune checkpoint inhibitors are providing rapid and durable responses for patients with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.
Diagnosing melanomaNewer tools to help diagnose challenging lesions include combined immunohistochemical stains and a growing array of genetic tests, one of which has shown the potential to gauge metastatic risk.
Dermatology’s 2017 Game ChangersSeveral dermatologists go over what they're most excited about to see in 2017 in a number of different topics ranging from AD treatment to off-label technology use, to more male patients.
How dermatologic research can get its groove backResearch in dermatology comprises only a small portion of the total amount of money spent yearly on research in fields such as internal medicine, neurology and cancer. The need for interested and talented individuals to tackle the big challenges in dermatology is greater than ever before, and practitioners are looking at ways to make the most of limitations in funding, compensation and opportunities that stand in the way of recruiting more qualified individuals to the research ranks.
Keloid care and insurers – will they or won’t they pay?Insurers tend to think of keloids as a cosmetic issue so they have a wide range of standards covering reimbursement for care and treatments. Practitioners must fully document the medical necessity of the care they provide and then code the conditions and treatments correctly to maximize their chance for reimbursement.
Coding 2017 and beyondRecent Medicare changes include the apparent disappearance of consultation codes, the addition of site-specific soft-tissue excision codes, and increasing pressure from overseers and auditors, says an expert.
What is micellar water and how does it cleanse?Micellar water cleansers, also known as cleansing waters, contain water and a very mild surfactant representing a dilute cleansing solution
What constitutes “mild” soap?Mildness is a marketing term that has consumer meaning when applied to soaps.