Dermatology

From scars to active acne: Technological treatment for hard-to-treat casesLasers and photodynamic therapy are practical treatment options for acne patients who fail or aren’t compliant with traditional first-line therapies. Today’s energy devices might also enhance acne treatment as adjuvant therapy, a review shows.
Latest in dermatology productsThe latest roundup of new dermatology products includes safe ultrasound treatment in the home, skincare for aging skin, and topical pain relief.
The vanishing act of solo practiceHealthcare is being delivered in a different environment from that of our predecessors, Dr. Wheeland says. Is it still possible for the solo dermatologist to succeed?
Can you identify atopic dermatitis phenotypes in children?In this slideshow, we summarize the phenotypes associated with childhood atopic dermatitis as addressed recently in JAMA Pediatrics.
Promising new treatments for plaque psoriasisThe American College of Rheumatology annual meeting wrapped this month in San Diego. Results from long-awaited safety trials show promising new treatments.
Cannula use pearlsChoosing between a needle or cannula for filler injections is largely a matter of individual preference, said live-injection experts at The Cosmetic Bootcamp (CBC) 2017. For safety and accuracy of filler placement, they chose cannulas for filling the lips, hands and periocular area.
Noninvasive contour choicesChoosing technologies for noninvasive body contouring depends on what areas they are approved to treat, the local competition and — where available — the data, say experts.
6 questions to ask during performance reviewsAnnual employee performance reviews rank near the top of least favorite tasks for most physicians and their staff. Here are 6 questions to ask your employees to get the most out of the review process.
Dupilumab tames AD in difficult-to-treat patientsDupilumab given concomitantly with topical corticosteroids significantly improved signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis (AD) in adults refractory to or intolerant of cyclosporine A, a study shows.
Atopic Dermatitis in 2018Until recently, atopic dermatitis treatments were primarily limited to topical corticosteroids and systemic immunosuppressants. Now, two new therapies have reached clinical practice. Nineteen more are in development.