Wheeland_Ron-2.jpg
Ronald G. Wheeland, M.D.
Ronald G. Wheeland, M.D., is a private practitioner in Tucson, Ariz. He is former president of the American Academy of Dermatology, the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery and the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, and a long-standing member of the Dermatology Times editorial Advisory board and a co-medical editor.
Data will demonstrate surgery safety
At one time in the not-too-distant past of our specialty, the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) was so high ... that our national organization's name was changed to reflect the training and expertise that dermatologists had in treating STDs.
'The times they are a-changin'
By bureaucratic fiat, the changing times no longer give dermatologists the right to determine the most appropriate form of treatment for their patients.
DERMATOLOGY CASE CHALLENGE: An elderly man with a lip lesion
An elderly man presented with an asymptomatic bluish purple papule on his lower lip. He was concerned about its cosmetic aspect and whether it was (or might become) malignant.
The need for improving pain control for all patients
When I was a kid I used to dread going to the dentist. Fortunately, I've been blessed with good teeth all my life; so it wasn't that frequent dental appointments had sensitized me to the experience — it was purely and simply the fear of pain.
DERMATOLOGY CASE CHALLENGE: A 33-year-old woman with fingernail lesions
A 33-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes, adrenal insufficiency, and hypoparathyroidism presents for routine care. On physical examination, she is found to have desquamated, crusted, hyperkeratotic fingernail lesions.
The 'triple threat' and the future of academic dermatologists
There is grave concern in the academic community about the limited number of young physicians, including dermatologists, who are opting for careers in private practice instead of choosing a career in academics. The obvious question that arises is, will there be enough professors of dermatology in years to come to train the next generation? If there aren't a sufficient number of dermatology faculty members to train new dermatologists, who will be capable of providing high-quality care to patients with serious skin disease?
DERMATOLOGY CASE CHALLENGE: A diabetic patient with longstanding, expanding pretibial plaques
A 37-year-old woman presents with plaques of 1 year's duration on her lower legs that appear to be expanding. The patient has a history of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus requiring insulin but is otherwise well and taking no other medications. The clinician suspects granuloma annulare, cellulitis, sarcoidosis, xanthomas, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and necrobiotic xanthogranuloma.
Last chance for isotretinoin?
Recently you probably received registration materials in the mail to be completed so that in the future you will be allowed to prescribe isotretinoin to your patients. This new registration program might also have confused you, since we had been living with the "SMART" program for the past few years. So, let me try to set the record straight. This new program, known as iPledge, was not developed by the American Academy of Dermatology. In fact, our representatives have been actively involved at stages of isotretinoin review trying to keep this drug available for dermatologists. The program is free, but you must fill out the registration forms and return them in order to be able to use this drug in the future.

Poll

View Results