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Norman Levine, M.D.
Norman Levine, M.D., is a private practitioner in Tucson, Ariz. He also is a member of the Dermatology Times Editorial Advisory board and a co-medical editor.
Should dermatologists offer EBT?
Electronic surface brachytherapy is a low-energy radiation treatment for skin cancer. Radiologists are required to administer the treatment, which is controversial in terms of reimbursement and collaborative requirements.
PODCAST: Expert insights in managing melasma, part 1 on dyspigmentation
Two of the most vexing skin conditions that dermatologists manage are melasma and vitiligo. In one condition, too much pigmentation is present because of genetic, hormonal and environmental factors. In the other, there is a lack of melanin in the skin, presumably on an autoimmune basis. In part one of this discussion on dyspigmentation conditions, Seemal Desai, M.D., who is a board-certified dermatologist, clinical assistant professor in the department of dermatology at University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and medical director of Innovative Dermatology, discusses treatment options for melasma Dermatology Times editorial advisor, Dr. Norman Levine.
Expert insights in managing melasma and vitiligo
Two of the most vexing skin conditions dermatologists manage are melasma and vitiligo. Seemal Desai, M.D., board-certified dermatologist, clinical assistant professor in the department of dermatology at University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and medical director of Innovative Dermatology, discusses treatment options.
Minimize difficulties associated with State Medical Board complaints
Occasional irate patients are a fact of life of modern medical practice. We must all attempt to satisfy our patient’s needs as much as possible. Sometimes it simply does not work out. When called upon to defend your actions, do so in a professional manner. It will almost always conclude in your favor.
PODCAST Best practices for managing nail fungal disorders
Boni E. Elewski, M.D., professor of dermatology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, sheds light on treating nail fungal disorders.
TAKEAWAY Best practices for managing nail fungal disorders
Nail fungal disorders are one of the most common problems seen by dermatologists. Although treatments have been available for decades, the best we seem to achieve is about a 50 percent cure rate. Are there options now or in the near future that may improve these statistics? Dr. Boni Elewski sheds light on this subject in an interview with Dr. Norman Levine.
EMRs are good for your practice — really
Some years ago I wrote an editorial in this magazine about my early experience with an electronic medical record (EMR). I indicated that there were definite pitfalls, but overall, it was worth considering for your practice. Over the years I have become far more enthusiastic about this technology and would now strongly recommend it to all dermatologists, other than those who will be retiring very soon or those with a morbid fear of the 21st century and all that it has to offer.
PODCAST: Strategies for managing leg ulcers
Leg ulcers are a common and difficult management problem for all dermatologists. Robert Kirsner, M.D., professor and vice chairman, dermatology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, director of the University of Miami Hospital Wound Center, elucidates the diagnosis and management of these challenging skin problems.
PODCAST: Regulatory initiatives, deadlines inescapable
Although the timeline for implementation of the ICD-10 coding system has been pushed back to October 2015, all dermatologists will have to deal with this eventually. Meaningful Use regulations are also here to stay and will impact every practitioner sooner or later. Mark Kaufman, M.D., associate clinical professor in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical School in New York, explains the many vagaries of these initiatives for those of us who insist on pretending that they will never happen.
PODCAST: Path to EMR implementation remains a bumpy one
The electronic medical record (EMR) has become a fact of life for many dermatologists while others are hesitant to change the way they have practiced and have resisted switching to this form of record keeping. Daniel Siegel, M.D., discusses the ramifications of EMR adoption and outlines the path toward adoption of this technology.

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