Lisette Hilton
Lisette Hilton, president of Words Come Alive, has written about health care, the science and business of medicine, fitness and wellness for 25 years. Visit www.WordsComeAlive.com.
Aesthetics Q&A with Jennifer S. Hayes, D.O., gynecologist and gynecologic surgeon
The Aesthetics Channel sits down with Dr. Jennifer S. Hayes to discuss her transition from traditional obstetrics and gynecology to aesthetics.
Aesthetics Q&A with Jack Ringer, DDS
The Aesthetics Channel sits down with Jack Ringer, D.D.S., to discuss his interest in cosmetic dentistry and his advice for dentists who want to become involved in aesthetic dentistry.
BBL treatment reduces, delays skin aging
Researchers examine broad band light treatment for long-term skin quality results.
Energy Devices 101: Ultrasound
Ultrasound devices have two principle indications in today’s cosmetic practice: noninvasive skin tightening and noninvasive fat reduction. Here’s all you need to know.
Is your ideal practice fit within reach?
Deciding on whether to go into (or switch to) private practice, academic, or an employed model means weighing potential pros and cons of each setting and looking in the mirror at character traits, likes, and dislikes that would make one setting more suitable than another.
Aesthetics Q&A with Urologist Karen Elizabeth Boyle, M.D.
Urologist Karen Elizabeth Boyle, M.D., F.A.C.S., discusses aesthetic challenges, what she would do differently if entering aesthetics today, and the impact of aesthetics on her practice's bottom line.
Eyelid crease complexity
Double eyelid surgery may be in high demand, but also results in high numbers of unhappy patients according to recent research.
How to weed out price shoppers
Price transparency platform gives consumers — and physicians — what they want.
Sharing is caring: Millennial patients and social media
Not only is the selfie generation happy to share, but they could be the secret to social media success.
Ingredients in eczema topicals pose contact dermatitis risk
Ingredients used in topical products used to relieve atopic dermatitis in children might put those patients at higher risk for contact dermatitis.

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