Marian Freedman
Marian Freedman is a freelance writer.
Half of children with reported penicillin allergy symptoms are not truly allergic
Parents of children who visit a pediatric emergency department often report that their child has an allergy to penicillin, which can lead to treatment with a less than optimal antibiotic.
Loss of a father is associated with impaired cellular function
The link between a child’s losing a father and poor health is well documented. Now a new study shines a light on the biologic factors that may underlie this association.
Pediatricians could do more to provide tobacco counseling
Most pediatricians advise patients and their parents who smoke to quit, and the proportion of those who do so changed little from 2004 to 2010, according to surveys conducted in those years.
Nonoperative management of acute appendicitis
Compared with traditional appendectomy, nonoperative management (NOM) of uncomplicated appendicitis using parenteral antibiotics is associated with more subsequent emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, as well as more subsequent appendectomies.
Childhood firearm injuries remain a public problem
Almost 1300 US children die and 5790 are treated for gunshot wounds each year, according to an analysis of information in several national databases.
Antibiotics improve outcomes in small skin abscesses
Antibiotic treatment with either clindamycin or trimethoprim- sulfa - methoxazole (TMP-SMX) leads to better outcomes than incision and drainage with placebo in patients with uncomplicated cutaneous abscesses, particularly those caused by Staphylococcus aureus, according to a large study.
Pediatricians could be overprescribing combination antifungal/corticosteroids
A review of a large claims-based database suggests that they are. Investigators identified almost 10,000 children aged up to 14 years who were prescribed either Lotrisone or Mycolog-II creams (antifungal and corticosteroid combination products) by pediatricians and other specialists from 2007 through 2014.
Novel approach to neonatal abstinence syndrome shortens hospital stay
Infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) treated with supportive nonpharmacologic interventions have a substantially shorter hospital stay and are less likely to be treated with morphine, a new study shows.
Q-tips are still causing pediatric ear injuries
Between 1990 and 2010, more than 260,000 children were treated in emergency departments (EDs) for ear injuries related to use of cotton-tip applicators (CTAs), according to data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.
Mealtime TV use during infancy is likely to persist
More than one-third of families of 184 infants surveyed every 6 months during a 4-year period reported exposing their child to TV during meals.

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