Elaine Siegfried, M.D.
Elaine Siegfried, M.D., is professor of pediatrics and dermatology, Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center, St. Louis, Mo. She also is a member of the Dermatology Times Editorial Advisory board and a co-medical editor.
Isotretinoin's discovery and development series
Dr. Jim Leyden, an active participant in isotretinoin's drug development process, discusses many of the important initial clinical observations and those that others have made over the years.
Doctor faces obstacles as patient advocate
Even when quality-of-care concerns prompt physicians to advocate on behalf of family members, navigating the medical system can be challenging and fraught with difficulty.
Isotretinoin’s discovery and development
Dermatology Times editorial advisor Dr. Elaine Siegfried talks with Jim Leyden, M.D., emeritus professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania about the art and science of isotretinoin therapy. Dr. Leyden, aside from being a member of the famed Acne Mafia, was a really active participant in the drug development process for isotretinoin, a drug for which, the institutional memory about that process may be fading. The two discuss many of the important initial clinical observations and those that others have made over the years.
Screening labs, complacency, and the ABCDEs of pediatric melanoma
In part three of our discussion about pediatric dermatology, Kelly Cordoro, M.D., associate professor of dermatology and pediatrics at the University of California in San Francisco, discusses screening labs, avoiding complacency, and the ABCDEs of melanoma with Dermatology Times editorial advisor, Elaine Siegfried, M.D.
Nailing the diagnosis
The differential approach to diagnosis was first suggested a century ago by a pioneering German psychiatrist, Emil Kraeplin, but contributions to the evolution of the differential diagnosis (Ddx) have been made by countless outstanding physician-scientist-educators. Investing the time in direct communication with colleagues, rather than waging chart wars, is usually a very worthwhile win-win-win for clinicians, patients and colleagues.
Clinical pearls in pediatric dermatology
Pediatric dermatology is a rewarding area of special interest for dermatologists. Overlapping conditions, the need for extra-gentle skin care, patient compliance, and medication adherence all present unique challenges for pediatric dermatologists. In part one of our discussion, Kelly Cordoro, M.D., associate professor of dermatology and pediatrics at the University of California in San Francisco, discusses differentiating diseases and treatment recommendations with Dermatology Times editorial advisor, Elaine Siegfried, M.D.
My easy-to-remember "isms" aid patient communication
Additional years of repeating justifications to students, residents and patients have honed explanations into my -isms. These are kernels of truth packed into few easy-to-remember words, as an efficient way to communicate.
PODCAST: Considering alternatives
Peter Lio, M.D., assistant professor of clinical dermatology and pediatrics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, and private practice, Dermatology and Aesthetics of Wicker Park, Wicker Park, Chicago, discusses his interest in alternative medicine, the legitimacy and usefulness of certain therapies, and which therapies you might consider for different conditions.
Takeaway: Considering alternatives
Takeaway: Considering alternatives
Dermatology Times editorial advisor, Elaine Siegfried, M.D., talks with Peter Lio, M.D., assistant professor of clinical dermatology and pediatrics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, and private practice, Dermatology and Aesthetics of Wicker Park, Wicker Park, Chicago, about his interest in alternative medicine and the legitimacy and usefulness of certain techniques and therapies.
PODCAST: The future of teledermatology and how to make it work for you
Carrie Kovarik, M.D., associate professor in the department of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, talks about the nuances of making teledermatology work, what the future may hold, and how to get involved if you’re interested.

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